Vintage Copper Wall-Mounted Clocks by Standard and Telechron

$675.00
16” dia. and up to 5” deepSelection of vintage wall-mounted industrial-style clocks — three by Standard Electric Time of Springfield, MA (with Roman numerals); two by Warren Telechron of Ashland, MA. Variety of housings, ranging from bright copper to deep patinated copper as well as aluminium. Clocks are fully intact and in working order. Price per clock. Henry Warren: the Synchronous Motor and the Master Clock[edit]Warren master clock, installed in utility power plants, made accurate synchronous clocks possible.Henry E. Warren established the company in 1912 in Ashland, Massachusetts. Initially, it was called "The Warren Clock Company," producing battery-powered clocks. These proved unreliable, however, since batteries weakened quickly, which resulted in inaccurate time-keeping. Warren saw electric motors as the solution to this problem. In 1915, he invented a self-starting synchronous motor consisting of a rotor and a coil, which was patented in 1918.[1] A synchronous motor spins at the same rate as the cycle of the alternating current driving it. Synchronous electric clocks had been available previously, but had to be started manually. In later years, Telechron would advertise its clocks as "bringing true time," because power plants had begun to maintain frequency of the alternating current very close to an average of 60 Hz. But such constancy did not yet exist when Warren first experimented with his synchronous motors. Irregularities in the frequency of the alternating current led not only to inaccurate time-keeping but, more seriously, to incompatible power grids in the United States, as power could not readily be transferred from one grid to another. In order to overcome these problems, Warren invented a "master clock," which he installed at the Boston Edison Company in 1916. This master clock had two movements, one driven by a synchronous motor connected to the current produced by the power plant, the other driven by a traditional spring and pendulum. The pendulum was adjusted twice a day in accordance with time signals received from the Naval Observatory. As long as the hands of the electric clock, powered by a 60 Hz synchronous motor, moved along perfectly with those of the "traditional" clock, the power produced by the electric company was uniform.[2] In Electrifying Time, Jim Linz writes that "in 1947, Warren Master Clocks regulated over 95 percent of the electric lines in the United States."[3]It is interesting to note, then, that the uniformity of alternating current in the United States, which was necessary in order to build large power grids, was initially ensured by a very traditional clock system. Furthermore, Henry Warren invented his master clock at first simply in order to guarantee that his synchronous clock motor would provide accurate time.Telechron and Art Deco[edit]The Telechron company's success from the 1920s into the 1950s was not solely due to the technical advantages of their clocks, although all Telechron clocks were powered by successive versions of Henry Warren's synchronous motor.[4]Rather, the Telechron company sought to produce clocks whose designs reflected one of the fundamental principles of the Art Deco movement: to combine modern engineering (including mass-production) with the beauty of simple geometric shapes. Thus, Telechron clocks are often considered genuine pieces of art—but art affordable by all, as thousands of them were made. The company employed some of the finest designers of the time, such as Leo Ivan Bruce (1911–1973) and John P. Rainbault. In the evolution of their designs, Telechron clocks were a faithful mirror of their own time. Just as a clock like the "Administrator" (designed by Leo Ivan Bruce) reflected thirties aesthetics, so the "Dimension" had 1950s lines. Telechrons were relatively expensive compared to other clocks. In 1941, their most inexpensive alarm clock was the model 7H117 "Reporter," and it sold for $2.95, the equivalent of $30.00 in 2008 funds. But their beautiful design and amazing reliability assured a brisk market for them throughout the company's most prosperous years.

16” dia. and up to 5” deep

Selection of vintage wall-mounted industrial-style clocks — three by Standard Electric Time of Springfield, MA (with Roman numerals); two by Warren Telechron of Ashland, MA. Variety of housings, ranging from bright copper to deep patinated copper as well as aluminium. Clocks are fully intact and in working order. Price per clock.

Henry Warren: the Synchronous Motor and the Master Clock[edit]

Warren master clock, installed in utility power plants, made accurate synchronous clocks possible.

Henry E. Warren established the company in 1912 in Ashland, Massachusetts. Initially, it was called "The Warren Clock Company," producing battery-powered clocks. These proved unreliable, however, since batteries weakened quickly, which resulted in inaccurate time-keeping. Warren saw electric motors as the solution to this problem. In 1915, he invented a self-starting synchronous motor consisting of a rotor and a coil, which was patented in 1918.[1] A synchronous motor spins at the same rate as the cycle of the alternating current driving it. Synchronous electric clocks had been available previously, but had to be started manually. In later years, Telechron would advertise its clocks as "bringing true time," because power plants had begun to maintain frequency of the alternating current very close to an average of 60 Hz. 

But such constancy did not yet exist when Warren first experimented with his synchronous motors. Irregularities in the frequency of the alternating current led not only to inaccurate time-keeping but, more seriously, to incompatible power grids in the United States, as power could not readily be transferred from one grid to another. In order to overcome these problems, Warren invented a "master clock," which he installed at the Boston Edison Company in 1916. 

This master clock had two movements, one driven by a synchronous motor connected to the current produced by the power plant, the other driven by a traditional spring and pendulum. The pendulum was adjusted twice a day in accordance with time signals received from the Naval Observatory. As long as the hands of the electric clock, powered by a 60 Hz synchronous motor, moved along perfectly with those of the "traditional" clock, the power produced by the electric company was uniform.[2] In Electrifying Time, Jim Linz writes that "in 1947, Warren Master Clocks regulated over 95 percent of the electric lines in the United States."[3]

It is interesting to note, then, that the uniformity of alternating current in the United States, which was necessary in order to build large power grids, was initially ensured by a very traditional clock system. Furthermore, Henry Warren invented his master clock at first simply in order to guarantee that his synchronous clock motor would provide accurate time.

Telechron and Art Deco[edit]

The Telechron company's success from the 1920s into the 1950s was not solely due to the technical advantages of their clocks, although all Telechron clocks were powered by successive versions of Henry Warren's synchronous motor.[4]Rather, the Telechron company sought to produce clocks whose designs reflected one of the fundamental principles of the Art Deco movement: to combine modern engineering (including mass-production) with the beauty of simple geometric shapes. Thus, Telechron clocks are often considered genuine pieces of art—but art affordable by all, as thousands of them were made. The company employed some of the finest designers of the time, such as Leo Ivan Bruce (1911–1973) and John P. Rainbault. In the evolution of their designs, Telechron clocks were a faithful mirror of their own time. Just as a clock like the "Administrator" (designed by Leo Ivan Bruce) reflected thirties aesthetics, so the "Dimension" had 1950s lines. Telechrons were relatively expensive compared to other clocks. In 1941, their most inexpensive alarm clock was the model 7H117 "Reporter," and it sold for $2.95, the equivalent of $30.00 in 2008 funds. But their beautiful design and amazing reliability assured a brisk market for them throughout the company's most prosperous years.

Care Guidelines for Wood Finishes 

  1. Use a dry lint-free cloth to keep the piece dust-free. 
  2. For heavy messes, lightly clean the piece with damp lint-free cloth.
  3. Using coasters is highly recommended on all pieces to avoid drink rings and liquid damage.
  4.  For glass rings and water spots, gently rub the affected area with a warm, water-damp clean cotton cloth along the grain until marks are removed. Ensure to use less pressure to feather the affected area with existing finish. If a ring is persistent after water dries completely, apply a thin coat of soap. Finish with a cotton cloth liberally to the affected area and existing finish. Buff with clean, dry cloth if needed, after waiting 1 hour to dry. 
  5. We recommend a yearly clean of wood finished furniture following the guidelines below:
    1. Use a Scotchbrite pad to lightly buff the piece, following the direction of the wood grain.
    2. Apply the prepared Soap Finish with a cotton cloth in a thick layer to the entire piece. Ensure to wipe off excess soap and buff the finish into the wood.
    3. Allow to dry for 1 hour.
    4. Use a Scotchbrite pad to very lightly buff the entire piece when applying more than one coat. 2-3 coats is recommended or until the desired effect is achieved.
    5. Allow the piece to dry overnight after applying the final coat, then buff with a cotton cloth.

 

Care Guidelines for Stone Finishes 

  1. Use a dry lint-free cloth to keep the piece dust-free.
  2. For heavy messes, lightly clean the piece with damp lint-free cloth. Use a diluted neutral liquid soap for greasy spills.
  3. Twice a year, matte sealant should be applied. Another method is the traditional Italian method, wiping clear mineral oil onto marble every few months to keep surfaces looking hydrated and moisture resistant.
  4. The provided methods do not provide protection against acid. Ensure spills are wiped off as quickly as possible.

 

Care Guidelines for Metal Hardware Finishes

  1. All metal finishes are hand-finished using organic compounds only. These finishes change over time depending on exposure to the elements, handling methods and cleaning methods.
  2. Use a dry lint-free cloth to keep the piece dust-free.

 

Care Guidelines for Lighting Finishes

  1. All metal finishes are hand-finished using organic compounds only. These finishes change over time depending on exposure to the elements, handling methods and cleaning methods.
  2. Ensure to handle light fixtures gently, wearing cotton gloves. 
  3. Use a dry lint-free cloth to keep the piece dust-free.
  4. Using water or cleaning products on metal finishes voids Scott Landon’s warranty policy. 

 

Care Guideline for Leather Finishes 

  1. This Canadian or US leather is made to endure wear and age. It often develops deeper colours, more shine and softness as it is used. Exposure to water, light and handling are factors that develop the leather’s unique patine and ages the material in its own way.
  2. Natural imperfections of full grain leather are common. 
  3. Use a vacuum or broom to clean dust or particulates.
  4. Staining of leather can happen, and a subsequent change in color follows. Use a dry cloth to clean spills as quickly as possible. After, use a damp cloth to soften stain edge marks. Never rub stain, blotting only. Allow it to dry.
  5. For tougher leather, lightly rubbing with an abrasive 3M pad with short strokes can make the process easier. This naturally lifts the fibers and minimizes the stain. 
  6. For suede leather, use a suede brush to bring up the texture after long periods of use.