Kayserzinn Art Nouveau Pewter Pitcher with Devils Head

$595.00
German Kayserzinn pewter wine/water pitcher or jug with Art Nouveau style low relief iris decoration centered by a Devils head under the spout and a handle designed as a vine branch. Note In 1890 Engelbert Kayser decided to lead the factory in order to abolish the distinction and unite the productions. There were two main artists and designers who worked with Engelbert: Hugo Leven and Karl Geyer. The collaboration between Engelbert, Leven and Geyer led to the development of the first collections and services until 1901. This is the period of floral decorations in relief made by Leven. In 1900, during the Paris worldwide exhibition, Engelbert Kayser received a gold medal as the main designer of Kayserzinn factory in Krefeld, whose production increased a lot because of this important praise. In this period Leven and Fauser began to use clay and plasticine and developed a new technique called “Daumendrückrelief”, by which the relief was less perceivable and decorations appeared nearly engraved, in bas-relief. From 1902, when Kayserzinn got a second worldwide praise, to 1904 more than 100 new models were invented and Karl Berghof presented innovative conic and cylindrical forms. In 1904 Kayserzinn received its last praise at the world exhibition in St. Louis (USA) but from this moment the production started to diminish and Leven and Fauser left their job at the atelier. Engelbert Kayser dead in Cologne in 1911, and the outbreak of the first world war, together with the increasing price of the rough tin caused the abandoned of the atelier. The rich war ministry tried to preserve the Krefeld factory but, with the passage of time all the molds of Art Nouveau were sold and in February 1930 began the bankruptcy of “J. P. Kayser Sohn AG Krefeld Fabrik”. 16.00" X 8.00" X 6.00"

German Kayserzinn pewter wine/water pitcher or jug with Art Nouveau style low relief iris decoration centered by a Devils head under the spout and a handle designed as a vine branch. Note In 1890 Engelbert Kayser decided to lead the factory in order to abolish the distinction and unite the productions. There were two main artists and designers who worked with Engelbert: Hugo Leven and Karl Geyer. The collaboration between Engelbert, Leven and Geyer led to the development of the first collections and services until 1901. This is the period of floral decorations in relief made by Leven. In 1900, during the Paris worldwide exhibition, Engelbert Kayser received a gold medal as the main designer of Kayserzinn factory in Krefeld, whose production increased a lot because of this important praise. In this period Leven and Fauser began to use clay and plasticine and developed a new technique called “Daumendrückrelief”, by which the relief was less perceivable and decorations appeared nearly engraved, in bas-relief. From 1902, when Kayserzinn got a second worldwide praise, to 1904 more than 100 new models were invented and Karl Berghof presented innovative conic and cylindrical forms. In 1904 Kayserzinn received its last praise at the world exhibition in St. Louis (USA) but from this moment the production started to diminish and Leven and Fauser left their job at the atelier. Engelbert Kayser dead in Cologne in 1911, and the outbreak of the first world war, together with the increasing price of the rough tin caused the abandoned of the atelier. The rich war ministry tried to preserve the Krefeld factory but, with the passage of time all the molds of Art Nouveau were sold and in February 1930 began the bankruptcy of “J. P. Kayser Sohn AG Krefeld Fabrik”.

16.00" X 8.00" X 6.00"

Care Guidelines for Wood Finishes 

  1. Use a dry lint-free cloth to keep the piece dust-free. 
  2. For heavy messes, lightly clean the piece with damp lint-free cloth.
  3. Using coasters is highly recommended on all pieces to avoid drink rings and liquid damage.
  4.  For glass rings and water spots, gently rub the affected area with a warm, water-damp clean cotton cloth along the grain until marks are removed. Ensure to use less pressure to feather the affected area with existing finish. If a ring is persistent after water dries completely, apply a thin coat of soap. Finish with a cotton cloth liberally to the affected area and existing finish. Buff with clean, dry cloth if needed, after waiting 1 hour to dry. 
  5. We recommend a yearly clean of wood finished furniture following the guidelines below:
    1. Use a Scotchbrite pad to lightly buff the piece, following the direction of the wood grain.
    2. Apply the prepared Soap Finish with a cotton cloth in a thick layer to the entire piece. Ensure to wipe off excess soap and buff the finish into the wood.
    3. Allow to dry for 1 hour.
    4. Use a Scotchbrite pad to very lightly buff the entire piece when applying more than one coat. 2-3 coats is recommended or until the desired effect is achieved.
    5. Allow the piece to dry overnight after applying the final coat, then buff with a cotton cloth.

 

Care Guidelines for Stone Finishes 

  1. Use a dry lint-free cloth to keep the piece dust-free.
  2. For heavy messes, lightly clean the piece with damp lint-free cloth. Use a diluted neutral liquid soap for greasy spills.
  3. Twice a year, matte sealant should be applied. Another method is the traditional Italian method, wiping clear mineral oil onto marble every few months to keep surfaces looking hydrated and moisture resistant.
  4. The provided methods do not provide protection against acid. Ensure spills are wiped off as quickly as possible.

 

Care Guidelines for Metal Hardware Finishes

  1. All metal finishes are hand-finished using organic compounds only. These finishes change over time depending on exposure to the elements, handling methods and cleaning methods.
  2. Use a dry lint-free cloth to keep the piece dust-free.

 

Care Guidelines for Lighting Finishes

  1. All metal finishes are hand-finished using organic compounds only. These finishes change over time depending on exposure to the elements, handling methods and cleaning methods.
  2. Ensure to handle light fixtures gently, wearing cotton gloves. 
  3. Use a dry lint-free cloth to keep the piece dust-free.
  4. Using water or cleaning products on metal finishes voids Scott Landon’s warranty policy. 

 

Care Guideline for Leather Finishes 

  1. This Canadian or US leather is made to endure wear and age. It often develops deeper colours, more shine and softness as it is used. Exposure to water, light and handling are factors that develop the leather’s unique patine and ages the material in its own way.
  2. Natural imperfections of full grain leather are common. 
  3. Use a vacuum or broom to clean dust or particulates.
  4. Staining of leather can happen, and a subsequent change in color follows. Use a dry cloth to clean spills as quickly as possible. After, use a damp cloth to soften stain edge marks. Never rub stain, blotting only. Allow it to dry.
  5. For tougher leather, lightly rubbing with an abrasive 3M pad with short strokes can make the process easier. This naturally lifts the fibers and minimizes the stain. 
  6. For suede leather, use a suede brush to bring up the texture after long periods of use.