1930s Stackable Lawyer’s bookcase by Gunn Furniture Co.

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1930s stackable lawyer’s bookcase, Gunn Furniture Co.

 

Glass-front lawyer’s bookcase from the 1930s, made by Gunn Furniture Co. in Michigan. Four individual cases can be stacked (as shown) or displayed as separate or multiple units. Vintage finished oak.

Dimensions: 60”H x 36”W x 14”D.

The company’s initial products were folding beds. As early as 1893 folding beds began to decline in popularity, so the company changed its name and its products to roll-top desks, sectional bookcases, letter filing devices, and similar goods. By 1896 the company boasted that it produced 80 styles of desks. In the 1910s and ‘20s the company produced sectional bookcases that included a module with pigeonholes and a fold-down desktop. Cases were made in walnut, mahogany, imitation mahogany, and quartered oak. In the mid-1920s Gunn introduced its trademark “Lino” desks and cafeteria tables, which had wood frames and black linoleum surfaces.

MARKS AND LABELS

As early as 1914, Gunn began to mark its furniture with the work “GUNN” in upper-case block letters, underlined on the bottom and slightly concave in their alignment on top. Desks and tables in the “Lino” line also are marked with the work “LINO” in block letters, with the foot of the “L” underlining the other letters. In the 1930s the trademark was modernized with a large upper case “G,” with part of the “G” underlining the “UNN”.

1930s stackable lawyer’s bookcase, Gunn Furniture Co.

 

Glass-front lawyer’s bookcase from the 1930s, made by Gunn Furniture Co. in Michigan. Four individual cases can be stacked (as shown) or displayed as separate or multiple units. Vintage finished oak.

Dimensions: 60”H x 36”W x 14”D.

The company’s initial products were folding beds. As early as 1893 folding beds began to decline in popularity, so the company changed its name and its products to roll-top desks, sectional bookcases, letter filing devices, and similar goods. By 1896 the company boasted that it produced 80 styles of desks. In the 1910s and ‘20s the company produced sectional bookcases that included a module with pigeonholes and a fold-down desktop. Cases were made in walnut, mahogany, imitation mahogany, and quartered oak. In the mid-1920s Gunn introduced its trademark “Lino” desks and cafeteria tables, which had wood frames and black linoleum surfaces.

MARKS AND LABELS

As early as 1914, Gunn began to mark its furniture with the work “GUNN” in upper-case block letters, underlined on the bottom and slightly concave in their alignment on top. Desks and tables in the “Lino” line also are marked with the work “LINO” in block letters, with the foot of the “L” underlining the other letters. In the 1930s the trademark was modernized with a large upper case “G,” with part of the “G” underlining the “UNN”.

Care Guidelines for Wood Finishes 

  1. Use a dry lint-free cloth to keep the piece dust-free. 
  2. For heavy messes, lightly clean the piece with damp lint-free cloth.
  3. Using coasters is highly recommended on all pieces to avoid drink rings and liquid damage.
  4.  For glass rings and water spots, gently rub the affected area with a warm, water-damp clean cotton cloth along the grain until marks are removed. Ensure to use less pressure to feather the affected area with existing finish. If a ring is persistent after water dries completely, apply a thin coat of soap. Finish with a cotton cloth liberally to the affected area and existing finish. Buff with clean, dry cloth if needed, after waiting 1 hour to dry. 
  5. We recommend a yearly clean of wood finished furniture following the guidelines below:
    1. Use a Scotchbrite pad to lightly buff the piece, following the direction of the wood grain.
    2. Apply the prepared Soap Finish with a cotton cloth in a thick layer to the entire piece. Ensure to wipe off excess soap and buff the finish into the wood.
    3. Allow to dry for 1 hour.
    4. Use a Scotchbrite pad to very lightly buff the entire piece when applying more than one coat. 2-3 coats is recommended or until the desired effect is achieved.
    5. Allow the piece to dry overnight after applying the final coat, then buff with a cotton cloth.

 

Care Guidelines for Stone Finishes 

  1. Use a dry lint-free cloth to keep the piece dust-free.
  2. For heavy messes, lightly clean the piece with damp lint-free cloth. Use a diluted neutral liquid soap for greasy spills.
  3. Twice a year, matte sealant should be applied. Another method is the traditional Italian method, wiping clear mineral oil onto marble every few months to keep surfaces looking hydrated and moisture resistant.
  4. The provided methods do not provide protection against acid. Ensure spills are wiped off as quickly as possible.

 

Care Guidelines for Metal Hardware Finishes

  1. All metal finishes are hand-finished using organic compounds only. These finishes change over time depending on exposure to the elements, handling methods and cleaning methods.
  2. Use a dry lint-free cloth to keep the piece dust-free.

 

Care Guidelines for Lighting Finishes

  1. All metal finishes are hand-finished using organic compounds only. These finishes change over time depending on exposure to the elements, handling methods and cleaning methods.
  2. Ensure to handle light fixtures gently, wearing cotton gloves. 
  3. Use a dry lint-free cloth to keep the piece dust-free.
  4. Using water or cleaning products on metal finishes voids Scott Landon’s warranty policy. 

 

Care Guideline for Leather Finishes 

  1. This Canadian or US leather is made to endure wear and age. It often develops deeper colours, more shine and softness as it is used. Exposure to water, light and handling are factors that develop the leather’s unique patine and ages the material in its own way.
  2. Natural imperfections of full grain leather are common. 
  3. Use a vacuum or broom to clean dust or particulates.
  4. Staining of leather can happen, and a subsequent change in color follows. Use a dry cloth to clean spills as quickly as possible. After, use a damp cloth to soften stain edge marks. Never rub stain, blotting only. Allow it to dry.
  5. For tougher leather, lightly rubbing with an abrasive 3M pad with short strokes can make the process easier. This naturally lifts the fibers and minimizes the stain. 
  6. For suede leather, use a suede brush to bring up the texture after long periods of use.


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